Category: Reference

The Language of Flowers Part 7: S – Z

Tin Teddy Language of Flowers Series
This entry is part 7 of an on-going series of Language of Flowers

In Victorian times it was very fashionable to associate “secret” meanings with certain types of flowers.

These connections weren’t very secret, as they were published in magazines and almanacs for people to use as a sort of coded language. Surprisingly many of the “meanings” were very negative and even quite nasty!

 

Here are some of these traditional associations, taken from my Sunlight Year Book 1896.

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

S

Saffron – mirth
Sage – domestic virtue
Saxifrage – widowhood
Scarlet Cyclius – beaming eyes
Scotch Fir – elevation
Sensitive Plant – sensibility, delicate feelings
Shamrock – light heartedness
Snakesfoot – horror
Snapdragon – presumption
Snowdrop – hope
Sorrel – affection
Sorrel, Wild – wit ill-timedTin Teddy Language of Flowers Part 1
Sorrel, Wood – joy
Southernwood – jest, bathering
Spanish Jasmine – sensuality
Spearmint – warmth of sentiment
Spiderwort – esteem not love
Spiked Willow Herb – pretension
Spindle Tree – your charms are engraven on my heart
Star of Bethlehem – purity
Starwort – afterthought
Starwork, American – cheerfulness in old age
Stock – lasting beauty
Stonecrop – tranquility
Straw, Broken – rupture of a contract
Straw, Whole – union
Strawberry Tree – esteem and love
Sunflower, Dwarf – adoration
Sunflower, Tall – haughtiness
Swallow-wort – cure for heartache
Sweet Basil – good wishes
Sweetbriar, American – simplicity
Sweetbriar, European – I wound to heal
Sweet Pea – delicate pleasure
Sweet Sultan – felicity
Sweet William – gallantry
Sycamore – curiosity
Syringa – memory
Syringa, Carolina – disappointment

T

Tamarask – crime
Tansy, Wild – I declare war against you
Tendrils of Climbing Plants – ties
Thistle, Common – austerity
Thistle, Fuller’s – misanthropy
Thistle, Scotch – retaliation
Thorn Apple – deceitful charms
Thorn, Branch of – severity
Thrift – sympathy
Thyme – activity
Tiger Flower – for once may pride befriend me
Traveller’s Joy – safe….
Tree of Life – old and
Trefoil – revenge
Tremella Nestoc – resistance
Trumpet Flower – fame
Tuberose – dangerous pleasures
Tulip  – fame
Tulip, red – declaration of love
Tulip, variegated – beautiful eyes
Tulip, yellow – hopeless love
Turnip – charity

V

Valerian – an accommodating disposition
Venus’ Looking-Glass – flattery
Venus’ Trap – deceitTin Teddy Language of Flowers 2
Vernal Grass – poor, but happy
Veronica – fidelity
Vervain – enchantment
Vine – intoxication
Violet, Blue – faithfulness
Violet, Dame – watchfulness
Violet, Sweet – modesty
Violet, Yellow – rural happiness
Virginian Spiderwort – momentary happiness
Virgins’ Bower – filial love

W

Walnut – intellect, stratagem
Walflower – fidelity in adversity
Water Lily – purity of heart
Water Melon -bulkiness
Wax Plant – susceptibility
Wheat Stalk – riches
Whin -anger
White Jasmine – amiableness
White Lily – purity and modesty
White Mullein – good-nature
White Oak – independence
White Rose (Dried) – death preferable to loss of innocence
Whortleberry – treason
Willow, Creeping – love forsaken
Willow, Water – freedom
Willow, Weeping – mourning
Willow-herb – pretension
Willow, French – Bravery and humanity
Winter Cherry – deception
Woodbine – fraternal love
Wood Sorrel – joy, maternal tenderness
Wormwood – absence

X

Xanthium – rudeness, pertinacity

Y

Yew – sorrow

Z

Zephyr Flower – expectation
Zinnia – thoughts of absent friends

 

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

The Language of Flowers Part 6: P – R

Tin Teddy Language of Flowers Series
This entry is part 6 of an on-going series of Language of Flowers

In Victorian times it was very fashionable to associate “secret” meanings with certain types of flowers.

These connections weren’t very secret, as they were published in magazines and almanacs for people to use as a sort of coded language. Surprisingly many of the “meanings” were very negative and even quite nasty!

 

Here are some of these traditional associations, taken from my Sunlight Year Book 1896.

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

P

Palm – victory
Pansy – thoughts
Parsley – festivities
Passion Flower – religious superstitionTin Teddy Language of Flowers 2
Pea – everlasting, an appointed meeting, lasting pleasure
Peach – your qualities like your charms are unequaled
Peach Blossom – I am your captive
Pear – affection
Pear Tree – comfort
Pennyroyal – flee away
Peony – shame, bashfulness
Peppermint – warmth of feeling
Periwinkle (Blue) – early friendship
Periwinkle (White) – pleasures of memory
Persimon – bury me amid Nature’s Beauties
Peruvian Heliotrope – devotion
Pheasant’s Eye – remembrance
Phlox – unanimity
Pimpernel – change, assignation
Pine – pity
Pineapple – you are perfect
Pine (Pitch) – philosophy
Pine (Spruce) – hope is adversity
Pink – boldness
Pink (Carnation) – woman’s love
Pink (Single) – pure love
Pink (White) – talent
Plane Tree – genius
Plum Tree – fidelity
Polyanthus – pride of riches
Pomegranate – foolishness
Poppy (Red) – consolation
Poppy (Scarlet) – fantastic extravagance
Poppy (White) – sleep
Potato – benevolence
Primrose – early youth
Primrose (Evening) – inconstancy
Privet – prohibition

Q

Quaking Grass – agitation
Quince – temptation

R

Ragged Robin – wit
Ramunculus – radiantTin Teddy Language of Flowers Part 1
Raspberry – remorse
Rood – music
Rhododendron – beware
Rhubarb – advice
Rocket – rivalry
Rose (Cabbage) – ambassador of love
Rose (Champion) – deserve my love
Rose, dog – pleasure and pain
Rose, maiden’s blush – if you love me you will find it out
Rose, musk – capricious  beauty
Rose, thornless – early attachment
Rose, white – I am worthy of you
Rose, white (withered) – I loved you once
Rose, yellow – jealousy
Rose, York and Lancaster – war
Rosebud – confession of love
Rosemary – remembrance
Rush – docility
Rye Grass – changeableness

 

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

 

The Language of Flowers Part 5: M – O

Tin Teddy Language of Flowers Series
This entry is part 5 of an on-going series of Language of Flowers

In Victorian times it was very fashionable to associate “secret” meanings with certain types of flowers.

These connections weren’t very secret, as they were published in magazines and almanacs for people to use as a sort of coded language. Surprisingly many of the “meanings” were very negative and even quite nasty!

 

Here are some of these traditional associations, taken from my Sunlight Year Book 1896.

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

M

Madder – calumny
Magnolia – love of nature
Mallow – beneficence
Maple – reserve
Marigold – grief
Marigold (African) – vulgar mindsTin Teddy Language of Flowers 2
Marigold (French) – jealousy
Marigold (Prophetic) – prediction
Marigold and Cypress – despair
Marjoram – blushes
Marvel of Peru – timidity
Meadow Lychnis – wit
Meadow Saffron – my best days are past
Meadowsweet – uselessness
Mignonette – your qualities surpass your charms
Milfoil – war
Milkvetch – your presence softens my pains
Milkwort – hermitage
Mimosa (Sensitive Plant) – sensitiveness
Mint – virtue
Mistletoe – I surmount difficulties
Mock Orange – counterfeit
Monkshood (Helmet Flower) – chivalry, knight-errantry
Moonwort – forgetfulness
Morning Glory – affectation
Moss – maternal love
Mosses – ennui
Mountain Ash – prudence
Moving Plant – agitation
Mudwort – tranquility
Mugwort – happiness
Mulberry Tree (Black) – I shall not survive you
Mulberry Tree (White) – wisdom
Mushroom – suspicion
Musk Plant – weakness
Mustard Seed – indifferenceTin Teddy Language of Flowers Part 1
Myrrh – gladness
Myrtle – love

N

Narcissus – egotism
Nasturtium – patriotism
Nettle (Burning) – slander
Nettle Tree – concert
Night Convolvulus – night
Nightshade – truth

O

Oak Leaves – bravery
Oak Tree – hospitality
Oats – the witching soul of music
Oleander – beware
Olive – peace
Orange Blossoms – your purity equals your loveliness
Orange Flowers – chastity, bridal festivities
Orange Tree – generosity
Orchis – a belle
Osier – frankness
Osmunda – dreams
Ox-Eye – Patience

 

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

 

The Language of Flowers Part 4: H-L

Tin Teddy Language of Flowers Series
This entry is part 4 of an on-going series of Language of Flowers

In Victorian times it was very fashionable to associate “secret” meanings with certain types of flowers.

These connections weren’t very secret, as they were published in magazines and almanacs for people to use as a sort of coded language. Surprisingly many of the “meanings” were very negative and even quite nasty!

 

Here are some of these traditional associations, taken from my Sunlight Year Book 1896.

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

H

Harebell – grief
Hawkweed – quick sight
Hawthorn – hope
Hazel – reconciliation
Heath – solitude
Heliotrope – devotion, I love but theeTin Teddy Language of Flowers 2
Hellebore – scandal
Hemlock – you will by my death
Hemp – fate
Hepatica – confidence
Holly – foresight
Hollyhock – ambition
Honesty – honesty (well, doh!)
Honeysuckle – devoted affection
Hop – injustice
Horse-chestnut – luxury
House-leek – industry
Hoya – sculpture
Hyacinth – game, play
Hydrangea – heartlessness
Hyssop – cleanliness

I

Ice Plant – your freeze me
Indian Pink – always lovely
Iris – a message
Ivy – fidelity

J

Jacob’s Ladder – come down
Jasmine – amiability
Jasmine, cape – transport of joy
Jasmine, yellow – grace and elegance
Jonquil – return my love

L

Laburnum – forsaken
Lady’s Slipper – capricious beautyTin Teddy Language of Flowers Part 1
Larch – boldness
Larkspur – levity
Laurel – glory
Laurestina – I die if neglected
Lavender – distrust
Lichen – solitude
Lilac, purple – first emotions of love
Lilac, white – youthful innocence
Lily, white – purity
Lily, yellow – falsehood
Lily of the Valley – return of happiness
Lime Tree – conjugal love
Lobelia – malevolence
London Pride – frivolity
Lotus Leaf – recantation
Love lies Bleeding – hopeless, not heartless

 

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

 

The Language of Flowers Part 3: D-G

Tin Teddy Language of Flowers Series
This entry is part 3 of an on-going series of Language of Flowers

In Victorian times it was very fashionable to associate “secret” meanings with certain types of flowers.

These connections weren’t very secret, as they were published in magazines and almanacs for people to use as a sort of coded language. Surprisingly many of the “meanings” were very negative and even quite nasty!

 

Here are some of these traditional associations, taken from my Sunlight Year Book 1896.

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

D

Daffodil – regard
Dahlia – instabilityTin Teddy Language of Flowers Part 1
Daisy – innocence
Daisy, Michaelmas – farewell
Daisy, Wild – I will think of thee
Damask Rose – bright complexion
Dandelion – rustic oracle
Dead leaves – sadness
Dock – patience

E

Eglantine – I wound to heal
Elder – zealousness
Elm – dignity
Endive – frugality
Everlasting – never-ceasing remembrance

F

Fennel – strength
Fern – fascination
Fir – argument
Filbert – peace
Fir Tree – true
Flowering seed – trust in heaven
Fly Orchis – error
Forget-me-not – forget me not (well doh!)
Foxglove – insincerity
French Marigold – jealousyTin Teddy Language of Flowers 2
Fuchsas – taste
Famitory – spleen

G

Garden Anemone – forsaken
Garland of Roses – reward of virtue
Geranium, ivy – bridal favour
Geranium, lemon – unexpected meeting
Geranium, oakleaved – true friendship
Geranium, scarlet – stupidity
Geranium, wild – piety
Germander Speedwell – facility
Gillyflower – bonds of love
Golden Rod – precaution
Gooseberry – anticipation
Grass – submission
Guelder Rose – winter, age

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

 

The Language of Flowers Part 2: C

Tin Teddy Language of Flowers Series
This entry is part 2 of an on-going series of Language of Flowers

In Victorian times it was very fashionable to associate “secret” meanings with certain types of flowers.

These connections weren’t very secret, as they were published in magazines and almanacs for people to use as a sort of coded language. Surprisingly many of the “meanings” were very negative and even quite nasty!

 

Here are some of these traditional associations, taken from my Sunlight Year Book 1896.

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

C

Cabbage – profit
Cactus – warmth
Camomile – energy in adversity
Canary grass – persuasion
Candytuft – indifference
Canterbury Bell – acknowledgement
Cape Jasmine – I’m too happy
Cardamine  – paternal error
Cardinal Flower – distinctionTin Teddy Language of Flowers 2
Carnation, Deep Red – Alas! for my poor heart
Carnation, Striped – refusal
Carnation, Yellow – disdain
Catchfly – snare
Cedar of Lebanon – incorruptible
Cedar Leaf – I live for thee
Celandine, Lesser – joys to come
Centaury – delicacy
Cereus (Creeping) – modest genius
Champignon – suspicion
Cherry Tree – good education
Cherry Tree, White – deception
Chestnut Tree – do me justice, luxury
Chickweed – rendezvous
Chicory – frugality
China Aster – variety
China Aster (Double) – I share your sentiments
China Aster (Single) – I will think of it
China of Indian Pink – Aversion
China Rose – relieve my anxiety
Chrysanthemum, Red –  I love
Chrysanthemum, White – truth
Chrysanthemum, Yellow – slighted love
Citron, ill-natured beauty
Clematis – mental beauty
Clematis, Evergreen – poverty
Clotburn – rudeness, pertinacity
Clover, Four-leaved – be mine
Clover, Red – industry
Cover, White – think of me
Cloves – dignity
Cockscomb – amaranth, foppery, affection, singularity
Colchicum or Meadow Saffron – my best days are best
Coltsfoot – justice shall be done
Columbine – folly
Columbine, purple – resoved to win
Columbine, red – anxious and trembling
Convolvulus – bonds
Convolvulus, Blue (minor) – repose, night
Convolvulus (major) – extinguished hopesTin Teddy Language of Flowers Part 1
Coreopsis – always cheerful
Coreposis, Arkansa – love at first sight
Corianda – hidden worth
Corn – riches
Corn (broken) – quarrel
Corn Straw – agreement
Corn Bottle – delicacy
Corn Cockle – gentillity
Coronella – success crown your wishes
Cowslip – pensiveness, winning grace
Cowslip (American) – divine beauty, you are my divinity
Cranberry – cure for heartache
Cress – stability, power
Crocus – abuse not
Crocus, Sprint – youthful gladness
Crown Imperial – majesty, power
Crowfoot – ingratitude
Crowfoot (Aconite-leaved) – lustre
Crowsbill – envy
Cuckoo Plant – ardour
Currant – they frown will kill me
Cyclamen – timidity
Cypress – death

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

 

The Language of Flowers – Part 1 – A – B

Tin Teddy Language of Flowers Series
This entry is part 1 of an on-going series of Language of Flowers

In Victorian times it was very fashionable to associate “secret” meanings with certain types of flowers.

These connections weren’t very secret, as they were published in magazines and almanacs for people to use as a sort of coded language.  Surprisingly many of the “meanings” were very negative and even quite nasty!

 

Here are some of these traditional associations, taken from my Sunlight Year Book 1896.

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

 

A

Acacia – friendship
Acacia, pink or white – elegance
Acacia, yellow – secret love
Aconite (Wolfsbane) – misanthropy
Aconite, crowfoot – lustre
African Marigold – vulgar minds
Agrimony – thankfulness, gratitude
Almond, common – stupidity, indiscretion
Almond, flowering – hope
Almond, laurel – perfidy
Allspice – compassion
Aloe – grief, religious superstition
Althea Frutex (Syrian Mallow) – persuasion
Amaranth (Globe) – immortality, unfading love
Amaryllis – pride, timidity, splendid beauty
American Cowslip – divine beautyTin Teddy Language of Flowers Part 1
American Elm – patriotism
American Linden – matrimony
American Starwort – welcome to a stranger, cheerfulness in old age
Amethyst – admiration
Anemone (Zephyr-flower) – sickness, expectation
Anemone, garden  forsaken
Angelica – inspiration
Apple – temptation
Apple blossom – preference, fame speaks him great and good
Apple, thorn – deceitful charms
Apricot – doubt
Arum (Wake Robin) – ardour
Ash-leaved trumpet flower – separation
Ash tree – grandeur
Aspen tree – lamentation
Asphodel – my regrets follow you to the grave
Aster, China – variety, afterthought
Auricula – painting
Auricula, scarlet – avarice
Azalea – temperance

B

Bachelor’s Buttons – celibacy
Balm – sympathy
Balm, gentle – pleasantry
Balm of Gilead – cure, reliefTin Teddy Language of Flowers 2
Balsam, red – touch me not, impatient resolves
Balsam, yellow – impatience
Barberry – sourness of temper
Basil – hatred
Bay leaf – I change but in death
Bay Rhododendron (Rose Rhododendron) – danger, beware
Bay tree – glory
Bay wreath – reward of merit
Bee orchis – industry
Beech tree – prosperity
Belladonna – silence
Belony – surprise
Bind small – timidity
Bindweed – insinuation
Bird’s Foot Trefoil – revenge
Black poplar – courage
Blackthorn – difficulty
Blue bell – constancy
Borage – Bluntness
Box tree – stoicism
Bramble – remorse
Branch of currants – you please me
Branch of throns – severity
Bridal rose – happy love
Broom – humility
Bud of white rose – heart ignorant of love
Bulrush – docility
Burdock – importunity, touch me not
Buttercup (Kingcup) – ingratitude, childishness
Butterfly orchid – gaiety
Butterfly weed – let me go

The Language of Flowers Part 1 – A-B
The Language of Flowers Part 2 – C
The Language of Flowers Part 3 – D-G
The Language of Flowers Part 4 – H-L
The Language of Flowers Part 5 – M-O
The Language of Flowers Part 6 – P-R
The Language of Flowers Part 7 – S-Z

 

Traditional Wedding Anniversaries

Tin Teddy Happy Anniversary Thumb

There is a story that the very first wedding anniversary gift was when a Roman Emperor gave his beloved wife of 25 years a silver wreath, and then when they reached 50 years he presented her with a golden one – and so the Silver and Golden anniversaries were born.

Whether this is true or not, the tradition of associating certain materials with different anniversaries is a very old one.  The 1st, 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 50th and 75th anniversaries have been celebrated since medieval times.

In 1937 the National Retail Jeweler Association in America added lots of new years to the list as a way to help gift-buyers choose a present.

Here is a list of anniversaries, together with the flower and gemstone traditionally associated with each anniversary:

[table id=1 /]

Next time you have a birthday or anniversary card to make and are stuck for inspiration you could use this table for ideas for your theme.

 

Want to know more about the Victorian’s secret code of flowers? Check out the new series – The Language of Flowers – on the Tin Teddy Blog.

 

 

Understanding graphics files

 

Digital graphics come in a variety of different file formats.  Which format is used depends on how high the image quality needs to be, how large the files can be, whether there will be text included and other considerations.

Here is a little guide to the most common image file formats that you may come across.

.jpg

Pronounced “jay-peg” – most of the graphics on the internet are in .jpg format.  This format compresses pictures so the file size is small.  Many graphics programs allow one to adjust how much compression is used. More compression means a smaller file size, but the picture quality will be poorer.  Over compressed jpgs often have coloured edges around elements in the picture, these are called artefacts, or ‘the jaggies’.

.png

Pronounced “ping” – png format is the one usually used for images that need transparent backgrounds.  There are other formats that can also handle transparency, but png is pretty much the standard nowadays as its files are small and high quality.  If you buy digital clip art it will probably be png.

.gif

Pronounced “gif” – Gifs are not as popular online as they used to be, but you may still see them.  They keep file sizes small by reducing the number of colours in the picture.  This means they are great for things like line art or bold cartoon images, where they number of colours is very low.  If used for photos they give rather blocky results.  The one thing that makes gifs super useful is they can not only be static pictures.. but also animations.  When you use a forum, and see a poster with an animated picture in their signature, that is almost certainly a gif.

.pdf

Pronounced “pee-dee-eff” – PDFs are more complex files.  They can include text and pictures.  They are often searchable, and sometimes editable.  They are often used for things like knitting patterns, ebooks, catalogues, promotional flyers, brochures, recipes etc.   You need suitable software to open and read PDFs.  Adobe Acrobat Reader is the most well known.  It is free and often installed with other software because so many programs use PDF for their manuals and instructions.  There are various other programs that can also read PDFs, including Photoshop.

.bmp

Pronounced “bit-map”.  Bmps were once very common but are now not used so often.  They preserve a lot of details in the image, but are very large files.  You may find older graphics in this format.

.zip

Pronounced “zip” – zip is not a graphics format but you may well be sent pictures in a zip file.  Basically the creator has ‘zipped’ the pictures (or any sorts of files) into one compact one.  The resultant zip file will be smaller than the sum of the individual components, making it easier to send.

You need a small program to ‘unzip’ the files.  The Windows operating system has one built in and will just open any zipped files for you.  Otherwise you can choose from many free programs that will do it.